My first personal website was online in the early 1990's. I don't even remember the URL. I recognize this now as a born digital artifact lost to the ether.

I wrote my first blog post at davidnunez.com in July of 2002, and since then, I've written over a thousand posts on this site, with the majority happening between 2002-2007. I migrated this site through at least 7 content management systems, but I have most of the work in some form or another. There's a chance I can preserve this narcissistic archive.

When I look at the collection of past posts, I see an obvious dip in the attention I paid this site over the last decade or so.  In that time, Twitter, Instagram, Youtube, and Facebook became our de-facto online publishing junk food. Profit-driven entities began consolidating makers and their creativity, monetizing them through paint-by-number self-publishing media. We have seen, through implosions of companies like Tumblr and Flickr, the danger of what happens when we trust too much of our culture to these centralized concerns.

The "Influencers" who have mastered the marketing game are flourishing and edging out the bloggers of the '00s that took the time and love to craft personal sites.  I'll grant that I'm an old man, but git off my lawn.

Nostalgia is a funny thing, and nostalgia that involves computers and networks seems really wrong.  However, when I was blogging regularly I was quite happy. I made friends online and in meatspace; I genuinely miss those days.  I miss those people.  It was joyful, and we were relentlessly generous with each other.  (Shout out to the Austin Bloggers.)  It felt artisanal and like HTML actually mattered (not that that's necessarily a good thing).  

My early iterations of this blog featured graphics that came from software I wrote to demonstrate social interactions. I remember spending weeks getting that done. Who does that kind of thing anymore?

davidnunez.com header circa 2002
davidnunez.com header circa 2002

It just so happens that today marks the beginning of another #the100dayproject. It's a global community of people dedicating the next 100 days to a creative habit.

So here's what I propose:

  • I will be spending dedicated time over the next 100 days working on this site. That could include writing new content, shaping the look and feel, updating portfolio entries, etc.
  • The site is intentionally minimal at the moment to give me a blank slate.  I don't expect it will remain so sparse over the next months.  It's rough around the edges and that's ok... perfection is the enemy of momentum.
  • I've taken offline all of my previous posts, save the very first one (and this one, obviously).
  • I'll be revisiting and republishing those old posts one at a time, in as close to original form as possible here. I've already skimmed the archive, and I can promise that a lot of my writing here was cringe-worthy.  However, there are probably one or two posts that I think are really good. Most of my blog has lost meaning over the years. I consider this to be a restoration project and perhaps a bit therapeutic.
  • Ultimately I want to recapture the joy I once had writing this site. If, after 100 days I don't find it fulfilling, I suppose I'll finally be OK with moving on.

Wish me luck.